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Volunteer Romania
Making A Change for the Better
The Children
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The Children

Your main objective on the Volunteer Romania programme is to put smiles on the faces of the underprivileged children.

Wherever we work we are faced daily with children, some are orphaned, some abandoned or neglected, some needing special care, all underprivileged. 

The work that we do whether attending to their physical needs, education or just having fun is so rewarding when you notice that their physiological needs have been met and they smile.

 

Wherever we work we are faced daily with children, some are orphaned, some abandoned or neglected, some needing special care, all underprivileged. 

The work that we do whether attending to their physical needs, education or just having fun is so rewarding when you notice that their physiological needs have been met and they smile. 

We at Volunteer Romania find it a privileged and honour to know the children, being accepted into their lives.

Here is an extract from one of Alison’s blogs which will introduce you to a couple of the children that we work with on a day-to-day basis.

 

Just so that you know….the children’s names have been changed for protection.  To those who have worked with us and the children, we would kindly ask (and we have no doubts that you will understand and respect this wish) that although you know the real identities of the children in the profiles, you too respect their privacy and protect their identities.

Thank you.

“Many ask - referring to a particular child “what is their story”?  Personally I prefer not to know their history, because it saddens and angers me, but of course I have been witness to and told about a few. So if you would like to know, please read on, remembering that these are just a few out of the hundreds of special little people that we work and have worked with.

Carolina – 6 years-old

Carolina was found wandering the streets at about two years-old in a very poor city on the border of Romania. She was taken in by our partner where she was named and stayed in their orphanage in the same city for the following year of her life. - In Romania, if a parent has not been in contact for a year, the child becomes ‘Ward of the State’, at this time they are able to be adopted. No one adopted Carolina.  Therefore, Carolina was handed into the care of our partner as official guardians and moved to a different Children’s Home about 300 miles away for another year, before she was moved another 200miles to Deva, which is where we met. Carolina is now six years-old and doing very well at school, despite the fact that she has no ‘real’ identity. No one knows who her parents are, why she was found on the streets or where she was born.

During term-time, Carolina goes to school, arrives back at the Home and then does two hours homework before a light supper and bed. Volunteers are able to help her with English and Maths – which she is very good at and also help her with any chores that she has to do. In the school holidays, Carolina is a regular and willing participant at our Holiday Clubs. She is very quiet, but loves to draw, paint, do collage and joins in with singing, dancing, games and sports. She has a great big smile!

Stephan – 3 years-old

Stephan was left at hospital after birth by his mother. Stephan’s mother was single and he was possibly an embarrassment to her and her family. – Whilst single parent families exist in Romania, they are frowned upon by many in the same way that the same people frown upon anyone who is ‘different’, be they deaf, blind or have any special need. In addition, there are very few men who will ‘take-on’ another man’s child in Romania, so this meant that the mother would probably have to raise him alone which is a very difficult thing to do here in Romania. Please note, the mother in this case is not the one to be judged.

Having spent the first year of his life in hospital – in what the locals’ call ‘The Baby Pool’, with many other babies, Stephan was handed over to the State and placed in the care of our partner.

Stephan now lives happily in the same apartment with another 10 children all of differing ages (like a real family) and is being cared for by the apartment nanny. He is now talking….very, very well and if you were to work with him, you would need to have eyes in the back of your head and wear running shoes every day!”

 

Read more about the children in the individual projects –  ‘Join Us’

or on Alison’s blog: With Love from Romania

 

 





 

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